Offshore InjuryBlog

Blogs Posted in April

Last Friday, a 41-foot supply boat overturned on the Neches River south of Port Neches. The incident killed one of the three passengers who were on the boat when it capsized. According to reports, the victim and two other workers from Carlsen’s Mooring Service were bringing cleaning supplies to a ship offshore. Carlsen’s Mooring Service is a company that supplies Port Arthur refineries and all ...
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Related Topics

Cruise Ship Accidents, News
Our firm has previously reported on the serious health crisis Carnival was facing in March. The Diamond Princess, the Grand Princess, and at least five other ships have all been host to serious COVID-19 outbreaks—more than any other cruise operator in the world. At one point, one of its ships had a larger cluster of coronavirus cases ever seen outside of mainland China. The result is staggering—in ...
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When looking at the history of the offshore oil exploration and extraction industry, it’s essential to look at some of the moments that have defined the industry—even if they’re bad moments. Examining oil rig disasters in history helps us learn about what went wrong. What changes could a company have made to its operations? What methods should oil rigs around the world adopt to stop another ...
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Arnold & Itkin’s offshore injury lawyers are fighting for the compensation that a platform worker from Morgan City, Louisiana deserves and needs. Our client suffered a stroke while working off the coast of Louisiana, but the operator of the platform failed to get him the medical attention that he needed in a timely manner. This delay in treatment caused the man to sustain serious disabilities that ...
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10 years ago, the nation was shocked by the deadliest oil rig explosion and fire in its history. When the Deepwater Horizon exploded on April 20, 2010, it claimed the lives of 11 workers, injured many others, and triggered one of the worst environmental disasters in United States history. It took two days for the Deepwater Horizon to sink and nearly three months to stop its well from leaking 210 ...
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The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) is an international maritime law that governs safety on merchant ships. The first version of the law was created in 1914. It was created in response to the Titanic disaster, the now infamous cruise liner sinking that claimed the lives of nearly 1,500 people. The creators of the treaty designed it to prevent the preventable loss of ...
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Arnold & Itkin Attorneys Noah M. Wexler and Ben Bireley recently filed a lawsuit on behalf of a Shell employee who is suffering after a lifeboat fell from an oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico. The incident killed two other workers and caused our client to sustain serious injuries to his head, neck, back, shoulder, knee, and other parts of his body. Offshore work is some of the most dangerous and ...
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